Red-leg syndrome disease in amphibians may be related to CRGV (Alabama Rot) in dogs

Vet Times October 12th 2018 reports that fish vet Dr Fiona Macdonald has revealed further possible links between cutaneous and renal glomerular vasculopathy (CRGV) affecting dogs, and the UK amphibian disease red-leg syndrome (see 2015 blog post by AlabamaRot.co.uk).

Aeromonas hydrophila (A hydrophila) bacteria may be involved in the cause or aetiology of CRGV (Alabama rot). The bacterium is found in watercourses and soil and is associated with diseases of fish and amphibians. A hydrophila causes ulcerative skin lesions in fish, with subsequent kidney failure. In amphibians (frogs, toads and newts} the bacteria causes ‘red-leg syndrome’ -redness of the skin, open sores which can result in death.

Serology test

“Dr Macdonald developed a serology test with Biobest Laboratories to look at the possibility of antibodies to A hydrophila. Samples were obtained from veterinary practices around the country – from Aberdeenshire to the south-west of England – mainly from both suspected and confirmed cases of CRGV, as well as in-contact dogs”, reports Vet Times.

She found some dogs showed antibody response to A. hydrophila which has a similar UK geographical spread pattern to CRGV.

Dr Macdonald observed: “Although A hydrophila is implicated in a major disease problem in amphibians – red-leg syndrome – this is associated with a Ranavirus*. There is some evidence the Ranavirus may be the primary pathogen, with the A hydrophila as an opportunist”, reports Vet Times.

*Ranavirus is a virus that infects amphibians (Wikipedia). Read about co-infection of amphibians with Ranavirus and A hydrophila

Read more in Vet Times October 12th 2018.

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