About Alabama Rot / CRGV

If your dog gets skin lesions or other symptoms consult your vet, without delay. “Unexplained redness, sores or swelling of the skin (on the paws, legs, body, face, tongue or mouth) are often the first sign of this disease.” (AMVS, Feb 2016)  After five years, we still don’t know what causes Alabama Rot.  From analysis by AlabamaRot.co.uk, we do know that 90% of confirmed cases have been in the six months during Winter and Spring (December – May). Information about Alabama Rot / CRGV for dog owners from Anderson Moores Veterinary Specialists (AMVS).

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3 cases of Alabama Rot in West Midlands, Staffordshire and Cheshire

Anderson Moores advise 14th December 2017:

“Unfortunately, we have to confirm 3 further cases of cutaneous and renal glomerular vasculopathy (often termed CRGV or Alabama Rot). The cases were from Edgbaston (West Midlands), Cannock (Staffordshire) and Alsager (Cheshire)
This brings the total number of confirmed cases to 112 since 2012 with 29 in 2017. Most confirmed cases have been seen between October and April. We would continue to advise owners to be vigilant and to seek advice from their local vet if their dog develops unexplained skin lesions/sores.

For help recognising some of the signs and to see a map of confirmed cases please visit www.vets4pets.com/stop-alabama-rot/

Alabama Rot cases in Berkshire, Greater Manchester, Warwickshire, Staffordshire, Devon and Lancashire

Anderson Moores advise (30th November 2017):

“Unfortunately, we have to confirm another six cases of cutaneous and renal glomerular vasculopathy (often termed CRGV or Alabama Rot). The cases are from Frilsham (Berkshire), Little Lever, Bolton (Greater Manchester), Rugby (Warwickshire), Cannock (Staffordshire), Torquay (Devon) and Chorley (Lancashire).

This brings the total number of confirmed cases to 109 since 2012 with 26 in 2017. Most confirmed cases have been seen between October and April. We would continue to advise owners to be vigilant and to seek advice from their local vet if their dog develops unexplained skin lesions/sores.

For help recognising some of the signs and to see a map of confirmed cases please visit www.vets4pets.com/stop-alabama-rot/Source Anderson Moores facebook page.

Alabama rot dog disease cases mostly occur in autumn/winter

The BBC report Royal Veterinary College researcher Dr Kim Stevens who confirms that about 60% of cases of Alabama rot, which has killed more than 100 dogs in the UK, occur in the first three months of the year.

New research by Kim Stevens has started to try and discover more about the risk factors and spread of the disease. The cause of the disease, which first occurred in the UK in 2012, is still unknown. However, researchers have found there are more cases in autumn and winter. Most deaths caused by the disease have happened in Hampshire, Dorset and Greater Manchester*.

The disease causes lesions on the skin and occasionally in the mouth. Some dogs can also develop life-threatening kidney failure.

Dr Kim Stevens, of the Royal Veterinary College, said her research, expected to conclude by the end of the year, would not identify the specific cause of the disease. She said it was instead designed to look for geographical patterns, as well as environmental and climatic risk factors. A “very obvious” pattern already found was linked to seasons, she added:

“There are limited cases over the summer whereas everything starts to pick up in November and at least 60% of the cases occur in the first three months of the year, so it’s very much an autumn/winter pattern that we’re looking at.”

UK dog deaths from Alabama rot since 2012

Berkshire 2
Cheshire 4
Cornwall 1
County Durham 2
Cumbria 1
Devon 4
Dorset 10
Dumfries and Galloway 1
East Sussex 3
Greater Manchester 12
Hampshire 18
Kent 2
Lancashire 2
Lincolnshire 1
London 3
Monmouthshire 5
North Yorkshire 1
Northamptonshire 1
Nottinghamshire 2
Shropshire 1
Somerset 2
Staffordshire 2
Surrey 6
Warwickshire 1
West Sussex 3
West Yorkshire 2
Wiltshire 3
Worcestershire 5
Wrexham 1
Source: Royal Veterinary College/Stop Alabama Rot

*  from the list of dog deaths by county, 40 of the 101 confirmed deaths since 2012 occurred in Dorset, Hampshire or Greater Manchester.

Epidemiology and cause of Alabama Rot project

First some definitions. Epidemiology is defined by Oxford Dictionaries as “the branch of medicine which deals with the incidence, distribution, and possible control of diseases and other factors relating to health”.  It is also the study of the causation of epidemic diseases according to Wikipedia. And CRGV is the scientific name for Alabama Rot.

This week the Alabama Rot Research Fund (ARRF) have reported funding an Alabama Rot / CRGV Epidemiology project by Dr Kim Stevens:

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Newcastle-upon-Tyne & Cumbria: dog dies of suspected Alabama Rot.

I received this very sad news (via our AlabamaRot forum) of a vet suspected Alabama Rot case in August 2017. The dog ‘Harris’, a three-year-old Hungarian Wirehaired Visla, was walked in Newcastle-upon-Tyne & Cumbria areas up to a month before the lesions were spotted. The 7 areas have been added to the ‘All Alabama Rot cases’ map. Kevin Day posted the sad news about Harris on his Facebook page.

Continue reading “Newcastle-upon-Tyne & Cumbria: dog dies of suspected Alabama Rot.”

Bournemouth Marathon – Raising money for Alabama Rot Research

Aaron is running in the Bournemouth marathon for ARRF because Catherine Moss & Aaron want to raise money for Alabama rot research.

Catherine Moss said:

“After losing our beloved dog Maggie to Alabama rot on 10th February 2017 [see Confirmed cases map] we want to try to help raise awareness and funds for more research into this awful disease so that hopefully very soon a cause, then cure might be found. If we reach the target Aaron will run it in fancy dress.”

Donate here.